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The State of American Health

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America is the best country in the world.  With the end of World War II we entered the 1950s, with it came many new ideas. One of which is what we now know as the supermarket. On those shelves in the supermarket were the products that were produced from the finest companies in America.  Our mothers bought them knowing that they were the best, and since they were the best, they were the best suited for our American families.

I was raised on a typical American diet, which consisted of Wonder Bread, which built bodies 12 ways, Oscar Mayer products, baloney, salami, with Hostess Twinkies. Every day after school, I would stop at McDonalds and have a cheeseburger fries and a coke.  At that time, no one knew it was bad for you.  This was the early 60s, and I was living in the American dream.  By the time I was eight I was overweight and was plagued with many allergies, breathing problems and health conditions. My pediatrician was Dr. Zabattski.  Ill never forget my visits to doctor Zabattzis office.  Next to each and every waiting room chair was a beautiful floor standing ashtray. The long base was made of ornate iron. On the top was a fairly large glass bowl and everyone in the waiting room was smoking.  When my mother and I went into the doctors office, he was wearing his white lab coat, had a stethoscope around his neck, a cigarette in his mouth and he and my mother both were smoking, while they discussed my breathing problems, allergies and my other health problems, I had weight problems too. I was so overweight in my youth that you could have called me Jabba. Most baby boomers are of the age where they can remember their doctors smoking and offices full of ashtrays.  Billboards on the highways and full-page print ads displayed doctors smoking cigarettes, Doctors prefer L&Ms or Luckys(what a name for a cigarette). Remember the Rolling Stones song, Satisfaction?  A line in the song goes like this;  He cant be a man cause he doesnt smoke the same cigarettes as me.

As a child I remember studying in school about how we have billions of bodily activities occurring daily.  How do we support these billions of activities?  Many of us grew up eating the typical American diet. I certainly did. This may be one reason our country is in the health state it is in.  The staple of our culture is snacks with names like Kix and Life, Wheaties, the breakfast of champions, cereals with purpose and meaning.

Between the foods we consume, and our fear, anger, and anxiety, its no wonder we have chronic diseases in this country running amuck.  Otherwise, tell me how the most advanced country in the world has the most cancer, heart disease, high blood pressure, obesity, and even constipation.  We could buy stock in Ex-Lax and become wealthy.  Its time to get our heads out of our rear and get real.  You dont have to have a degree in nutrition to figure it out or to know the difference between a carrot and a Cheerio. One is made by man for profit, and the other was created by the universe or God for human consumption and nutrition.

The health of our culture is eroding.  Our personal health, family relationships and the relationships with our selves has eroded.  How long must we cling to the paradigm of man is like a machine? In the healthcare industry, this paradigm has raised the doctors power were and he is responsible for our health.  If you eat Wonder Bread and or snacks and foods that are produced for profit, as most of your diet or all of your diet, sooner or later, something will break down.  Isnt that the belief behind buying health insurance?  You know, youll need it, its just a question of when.  Sooner or later, you will be using this health policy.  Thats why you continue to pay on it month after month, year after year, for many years.

What can you for your health that you are currently not doing?

What are you willing to commit to doing?

How will you contribute to your health and longevity?

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